About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
MSNBCW 4
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
evening. law-enforcement going house-to-house in the greater boston area searching for the terror suspect that is armed and possibly wired with explosives. the fbi and law enforcement searching with the 19 year-old who has managed to elude capture since this fire fight late last night. the second suspect in the monday boston marathon bombing. his brother tamerlan tsarnaev is dead and the boston area was under a lockdown and tell one hour ago urged jews stayed behind locked doors and told they were given the all clear to leave their homes. the largest shutdown in the history of any metropolitan area. here is the timeline. 10:20 p.m. last night and armed robbery reeorted at a 711 near the m.i.t. campus shortly after police received reports of shots fired on the campus. police responded to the scene and discovered in may t. campus police officer john collier shot in his car and was transported where he was pronounced dead. then the brothers hijacked a car then released him unharmed and a gas station but then less than one hour later it after it adjacent to the boston suburb during that chase
to contrast that with a well known famous saying among lawyers that hard cases make bad law. in a case like this, with such extraordinary circumstances, around such an aberrant event, the best opportunities to pass meaningful legislation are not in the wake of these sort of crazy one off extraordinary events. what do you make of that? >> well, it is a real conundrum. on the one hand, holmes was right. you don't want extraordinary circumstances to create general law for average circumstances. but in another sense, this was not extraordinary. in fact, we've been living in something of a bubble. the fbi has done actually a fairly amazing job over the last decade of stopping many terrorist acts like when they occurred in other countries and europe and the middle east. and this was one that got through. but there are ways in which you could actually change laws to further enable the fbi. going back to michael isikoff's report. what if members of this mosque in boston had contacted law enforcement authorities under a new program and warned them that this fellow tsarnaev was looking a little errat
to cell phones? >> i think they didn't they would have to escape. when law enforcement figured out different pieces of this puzzle, they panicked and didn't have an alternative plan -- they were so focused on what they were doing, nothing else became important and obviously, it would have been. >> another photo of the suspect coming in right now, it shows him when he was on the wrestling team. i believe, we're going to put that up in just a second. it just came in. they got it up in the control room. we're not positive, if indeed this gray honda is occupieoccup. it could suggest as well, aps someone else was involved. >> well, maybe, george, but the idea of a stealing a car or carjacking someone else, is an act of desperation. you have seen him acting in a desperate way since basically the 7-eleven. >> yeah that's true. brad, thanks very much. >>> jon karl at the white house right now. we know we're getting more details about the president's briefing in the situation room. >> george, as you can imagine this has consumed the president, entire intelligence and national security teams
. that got law enforcement zeroing on the two brothers. bill: mike, we're trying to piece this together as best we can but what can you tell us about the reports that the fbi is questioning him today from his hospital bed? >> reporter: all of that goes back to a "usa today" report citing anonymous sources. the sourcing is not as tight as i would like but certainly a significant development. we know he has been sedated. he has a injury to his neck or jaw, a bullet wound to his neck or jaw that prevented him from communicating. 9 report says he was roused back to consciousness and providing things in writing and providing substantive answers to questions. we know from the information he is providing that indicates there is not a larger network and not a second wave of bombings to be feared, bill. bill: mike, thank you. we'll be back with you when there are more headlines from boston. mike leading our coverage there martha. martha: we are hearing the police chatter when police first spotted dzhokhar tsarnaev hiding in that covered boat. massachusetts state police released the stunning infr
. they worked with canadian intelligence and u.s. national security and law enforcement officers to interrupt this alleged plot in an 8 month investigation code named project smooth. they said the plot was detected early on and neither american nor canadian citizens faced any imminent threat as a result. u.s. officials told fox news the defendants' objective was to blow up a bridge in the tore torrent area tornted while the plane was traveling over it mounted police told reporters today that they took steps to advance the plot including allegedly conducting own surveillance of trains in the greater torrent area. tornt area. >> the individuals -- >> now i can tell that you there is no information to indicate that these attacks were state-sponsored. >> the arrest took place in montreal and toronto this afternoon. search warrants were he can executed late today. beyond the fact that neither man is a canadian citizen the nationalities were not disclosed. however, a word press account established by one of them and taken off line listed him as to your knowledge born engineer trained in industrial
community and the attacks are impossible for the federal law enforcement community to stop. so how to make ourselves more resilient? the steps we need to take are not that sexy. we need to upgrade our transit systems and infrastructure so as to make them less vulnerable to attacks. for example, flynn notes the u.s. navy has invested more in protecting the single port of san diego that is home to the pacific fleet than the department of homeland security has invest ed in the ports of ls angeles, long beach, san francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
metropolitan area. only law enforcement, of course, is able to take to the skies in that area. we have what can only be described as an extraordinary situation in a major american city this morning. i want to turn to don berelli, a form fer special agent with the fbi, part of the joint terrorism task force, and has expertise and a security consultant. so much to talk to you about but i think you can't fathom a more dangerous situation for the officers who are responding here. >> absolutely. that was my first thought. it does not get much worse than this. you have somebody who has both weapons and explosives, and it appears they may have this person contained. appears, we don't know that for sure. but the concern, obviously, is could he be in a barricade situation, which is an extremely dangerous position for tactical officers and worse than that, could he take hostages and that's where the danger goes through the roof. this is the concern immediately as far as tactically what is happening on the ground there. then you have the added angle of possible accomplices. what's happening around the cit
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
or law enforcement believed the suspect could have fled. the investigation has continued to develop. we can't give you all of the reasons, all those developments right now. we will in the fullness of time. we can't right now. but, based on those developments, we feel it is prudent to be able to say to people "you can get back out as long as you are vigilant." >> did he he get away or do you know where he is? >> who is helping you? just the state police or additional municipalities? >> this has been an ongoing effort of the joint terrorism task force. it was from its onset and it will continue to be that. so you have the fbi, the state police, and all of the local police departments, clawgd the boston police department. [several talking at the same time] >> do you believe the suspect is still in the boston area or has he fled? >> i think i would be -- no, i don't have any direct knowledge that he is here in the boston area but we don't think he would get much further. his ties seem to be here. >> brian right here. >> how and when did you know that they were being islamic suspects? >> wel
significantly more complex. american law enforcement officials currently track terror networks by tapping into chatter, monitoring videos and reports of field agents, but even if the fbi is tipped off to potential american terrorists, there's are limits to what can be done. "the new york times" reports that after the tib questioned tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, officials had quote no authority to watch him because they found no terrorism activity at the time. this scenario that an american could and would do this while flying under the radar raises serious questions regarding national security. the "washington post" writes the boston attacks might serve as a new model for terrorism in the 21st century. seeing how two kids with backpack bombs seem to have succeeded in putting a major u.s. city on lockdown, it may now dawn on al qaeda leaders that a series of small-scale attacks like this conversation the same impact as one spectacular mass casualty attack. through a combination of skill and luck, we've done well at preventing the next 9/11. preventing the next boston massacre might not be as
of the establishment. look at aljer hiss. he was a supreme court court. his brother was a law partner. how could he be a communist spy? yet, he was. terrorists can learn that lesson. the best way to avoid scrutiny is to look like you fit in. >> we just had anna chatman, remember her, the sexy russian spy who is moscow and putin gave her an award. you raise a point about letting him back into the country, not just the first time but last year when he came back from russia. has there been an unfortunate pattern of that? egypt didn't want theli sheikh. he's convicted of being the leader of the cell that went to attack the world trade center in 1993 and plot the bombing of landmarks. he's a notorious convicted international terrorist. where is the gap? where are the holes? have we made mistakes? >> i think there are a lot of holes in our immigration system. look. i speak as someone who favors more legal immigration, but i can tell you. when i was at the justice department in the 1980s, fbi agents came and told me there were 10,000 iranian graduate students in the country and they weren't studying engli
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
to the contribution. so we need a law several levels of help to come and help. >> reporter: those seriously injured have been air-lifted to the provincial capital. the military has distributed tons of food, medicines and hundreds of tents - but the earthquake has left thousands homeless. >> residents are huddling outdoors in a town near the epicenter of a powerful earthquake that struck the steep hills of china's southwestern sichuan province. saturday morning's earthquake injured more than 6,700 people and left at least 160 people dead. and more are feared dead. the six-point-six quake triggered landslides and disrupted phone and power connections. one village was also hit hard, with authorities saying nearly all the buildings there had been destroyed in a the minute- long shaking by the quake. the earthquake administration said there had been at least 712 aftershocks, including two of magnitude-5.0 or higher. >> officials say that the area impacted by the fertilizer plant explosion in west texas is safe. city council member steve vanek says that the first wave of residents should be allowed to mo
tobacco from 18 to 21. the new law would not prohibit people under 21 from possessing or smoking cigarettes. if passed, the measure would be the strictest limit on tobacco of any u.s. city. awesome. >> you kind of wonder when the mayor is going to pass a law that is going to require each new yorker to read at least 30 minutes of poetry. >> no. this is good. >> that one i would not expect to happen. >> this is what we need. we actually don't even need anybody buying or smoking cigarettes and getting sick from it and getting other people sick too. >> mika, can i point something out? >> sure. >> the matrix awards yesterday. women in communications. mike barnicle's wife introduced by mika brzezinski. >> oh, look at her. mika did a great job. and you know, ann did pretty damn well herself. >> ann was amazing. there's martha stewart. there were impressive women there. but i had the great honor of -- this is funny. i had the great honor of introducing ann. and they asked at one point for last year's matrix winners to stand up and barnicle stood up. >> i was wondering when mike barnicle
to have a level of security greater than you did back in the olden days if you will. and our laws and our i object ter presentation of the constitution, i think, have to change. >> bill: all right here now to reply to that fox business anchor john stossel. disagree with mayor bloomberg? >> about a ton of things but not that really. these cameras are going to grow and that's okay. i disagree, i don't think the constitution needs to change. the constitution forbids unreasonable searches. i don't think a camera is that. >> we have a right to privacy also. you know, part of the abortion debate was a privacy issue. it you can believe it the supreme court decision roe v. wade. but privacy now what basically is going to happen is happening is once you step out of your house. you don't have any privacy anymore. that's it. >> in many ways you never did. he we reporters were very defensive in saying we the public have a right to take pictures of people. >> on public property, absolute gli. >> when you go too people's homes, that's another story. these cameras are in public. if you are outdoors toda
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16